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Project > ALMA

Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) - Taiwan

The Innermost Mass Distribution of the Gravitational Lens SDP.81 from ALMA Observations
ALMA Revealing the Pseudo-disk, Keplerian Rotating disk, and Jet in the Very Young Protostellar System HH 212
ALMA Revealing the Pseudo-disk, Keplerian Rotating disk, and Jet in the Very Young Protostellar System HH 212
ALMA Revealing the Pseudo-disk, Keplerian Rotating disk, and Jet in the Very Young Protostellar System HH 212
ALMA Revealing the Pseudo-disk, Keplerian Rotating disk, and Jet in the Very Young Protostellar System HH 212
NA 12m Vertex prototype antenna at the JVLA site in Socorro, New Mexico.
NA 12m Vertex prototype antenna at the JVLA site in Socorro, New Mexico.
Delegation from Taiwan during the ALMA inauguration in March 2013 at the OSF in Chile.
the procured NA 12m Vertex prototype antenna at the JVLA site in Socorro, New Mexico.
the latest tuCASA-ASIAA imaging workshop held at National Normal University ShiDa
the ALMA alternative laser synthesizer
Nutating subreflector in the laboratory at ASIAA
Nutating subreflector in the laboratory at ASIAA
EA-FEIC staff members celebrating the delivery of the very last front-end for Europe in 2012.
EA-FEIC staff members celebrating the delivery of the very last front-end for Europe in 2012.
EA FEIC team delivering the first front end to Chile in 2008.
EA FEIC team delivering the first front end to Chile in 2008.
the front ends during testing and integration at the EA FEIC
the front ends during testing and integration at the EA FEIC
1st Front End Service Vehicle (FESV) arrived AOS

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is the largest ground based astronomical telescope to be built. It consists of 66 telescopes operating as an interferometer at mm and submm wavelengths. Located in the Atacama desert in Chile, this scaled-up version of the Submillimeter Array is now officially online with the inauguration ceremony held on March 13, 2013 in Chile. Its large collecting area in combination with its location in a high dry region will permit sensitive observations leading to transformative science of the cool Universe. This instrument will be the preeminent instrument for studies of the relic radiation from the early Universe and of the formation and evolution of stars, planetary systems, galaxies and even the origin of life itself.

ALMA has three main partners: North America, Europe, and East Asia. Taiwan has been invited to participate both by ALMA-Japan and ALMA-North America. In 2005, ASIAA joined the ALMA-Japan project. In 2008, Taiwan joined the ALMA-NA project, with ASIAA as the lead agency for Taiwan. In close collaboration with Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, ASIAA has constructed the East Asia Front End Integration Center (EA FEIC) in Taichung. The center not only assembled and tested the 17 Front End systems to be installed in the ALMA-Japan antennas but had also delivered additionally 5 systems for ALMA-North America, and 4 systems for ALMA-Europe.

ALMA was opened for use by astronomers on September 30, 2011 at its first round of scientific operations, namely, ALMA Cycle 0 Early Science. Out of around 900 applications from astronomers around the world, we have succeeded in leading 8 of the 112 projects accepted. Later in January of 2013, ALMA started its Cycle 1 Early Science operation. 1133 proposals were submitted. 196 proposals were accepted, with 14 of them led by us.

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