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Activity > Colloquium

Colloquium (2017)

ASIAA Colloquium is usually held on Wednesdays at 2:20-3:20 pm in Room 1203 of the Astronomy-Mathematics Building, NTU. All scientists are welcome to attend.

The ASIAA-NTU joint colloquium series aims to bring to the physics/astronomy/cosmology community in ASIAA/NTU world renown researchers who will talk about the forefront development of physical sciences.

Contact: Colloquium Committee (talks_replace2@_asiaa.sinica.edu.tw)

NEXT Colloquium: 2017-02-08 Wed 14:20~15:20 [R1203]
Speaker:Peter Roelfsema
Topic:TBA
Abstract:TBA
No. Time/Place Speaker Topic / Abstract
download PDF: download talk PDF file
12017-08-23 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
I-Non Chiu
[ASIAA]
TBD
Abstract

TBD

22017-07-26 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Li-Ting Hsu
[ASIAA]
TBD
Abstract

TBD

32017-06-14 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Yu-Yen Chang
[ASIAA]
TBD
Abstract

TBD

42017-06-07 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Changbom Park
[KIAS]
TBD
Abstract

TBD

52017-06-06 Tue
14:20~15:20
R104, CCMS
Changbom Park
[Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS)]
*ASIAA/NTU Joint Colloquium*
TBA
Abstract

TBA

62017-05-31 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Ming Sun
[University of Alabama Huntsville]
TBD
Abstract

TBD

72017-05-03 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Xiaohu Li
[ASIAA]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

82017-04-26 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Ai-Lei Sun
[ASIAA]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

92017-04-19 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Andrew Youdin
[University of Arizona]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

102017-04-12 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Hayato Shimabukuro
[Observatoire de Paris]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

112017-03-29 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Kenny Vilella
[Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica]
TBA
122017-03-22 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Ziri Younsi
[University of Frankfurt]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

132017-03-15 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Sofia Wallstrom
[ASIAA]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

142017-03-08 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Xuan Fang
[University of Hong Kong]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

152017-03-01 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Samantha Lawler
[NRC Herzberg]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

162017-02-22 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Pham Ngoc Diep
[Vietnam National Satellite Center/Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology]
Millimetre/Submillimetre Astronomy Studies of Evolved Stars, Protostars and High Redshift Galaxies
Abstract

The observation of molecular emission at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths gives access to the study of stars having a large and cool circumstellar envelope as well as of the gas reservoirs of galaxies, in particular remote galaxies with redshift in the 2 to 5 range at the epoch of maximum star formation rate. The observation of the continuum emission underneath the molecular excitation lines provides important information on the dust content. Using Plateau de Bure and archival ALMA observations, we have been able to reconstruct in space, under simplifying hypotheses such as of invariance by rotation about an axis, both the morphology and the kinematics of such sources. Examples will illustrate these studies, including Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, protostars and gravitationally lensed high redshift galaxies.

172017-02-21 Tue
14:20~15:20
R1203
TBA
[TBA]
*Special Seminar*
TBA
Abstract

TBA

182017-02-15 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Marc Buie
[SWRI]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

192017-02-08 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Peter Roelfsema
[SRON]
TBA
Abstract

TBA

202017-01-18 Wed
14:20~15:20
1F auditorium
Dominik Riechers
[Cornell]
The Intricate Role of Cold Gas and Dust in Galaxy Evolution at Early Cosmic Epochs
Abstract

Dusty starburst galaxies at very high redshift represent an important phase in the early evolution of massive galaxies. They typically represent large-scale, gas-rich major mergers that trigger intense, short-lived bursts of star formation, which consume most of the available gas and drive the morphological transition to spheroids. At early cosmic epochs, these hyper-luminous galaxies commonly trace regions of high galaxy overdensity, and may be directly related to the formation of galaxy clusters and their giant central ellipticals. Molecular and atomic gas plays a central role in our understanding of the nature of these often heavily obscured distant systems. It represents the material that stars form out of, and its mass, distribution, excitation, and dynamics provide crucial insight into the physical processes that support the ongoing star formation and stellar mass buildup. I will discuss the most recent progress in studies of the cold gas content of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshift, back to the first billion years of cosmic time using CARMA, the Jansky Very Large Array, the Plateau de Bure interferometer, and the Atacama Large (sub)Millimeter Array (ALMA). I will also highlight our recent successful first detections of the interstellar medium in "normal" (~L*) galaxies at z>5 with ALMA, and discuss the impact of our findings on future studies back to even earlier epochs.

212017-01-11 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Francesco Costagliola
[Chalmers University of Technology]
Tracing the AGN/Starburst co-evolution in compact obscured nuclei
Abstract

Observations at all redshifts suggest that the AGN and starburst evolution across cosmic time are tightly linked. The recent discovery of ubiquitous giant molecular outflows revealed that even low-luminosity AGN can have a profound impact in the evolution and star-formation history of galaxies. The compact obscured nuclei of IR-luminous galaxies have been suggested to be the ideal targets to study the early stages of the Starburst/AGN interaction. However, because of the large extinction, standard Starburst/AGN tracers cannot be used to probe the central regions of these objects and new, more sensitive methods must be developed. Here I will report some of the latest results in the study of obscured AGN/Staburst activity including observations with ALMA and the JVLA.

222017-01-10 Tue
14:20~15:20
R1203
Koju Chuang
[Leiden University]
*Special Seminar*
Formation of Complex Organics in Dark Clouds - Sweet results from the laboratory -
Abstract

Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been not only observed in hot cores of low- and high-mass protostars, but also were detected recently in cold dense clouds. Besides energetic processing of ices that were shown to produce organic species, it is interesting to understand COM formation also under dense cloud conditions, i.e., without the presence of embedded energy sources. We present our latest laboratory study of the low-temperature (15 K) solid state formation of three complex molecules – methyl formate (HC(O)OCH3), glycolaldehyde (HC(O)CH2OH) and ethylene glycol (H2C(OH)CH2OH) – through recombination of active intermediate radicals. These free radicals are formed via H-atom addition and abstraction reactions along the CO→H2CO→CH3OH hydrogenation network, which starts from CO gas accreted on the grain that successively reacts with H-atoms to form H2CO and CH3OH. The present work extends on a recent CO hydrogenation study and aims to resemble the physical-chemical conditions typical of dark molecular clouds. We confirm that H2CO, once formed by hydrogenation of CO, not only leads to CH3OH through forward addition reactions, but is also subject to backward abstractions induced by H-atoms, yielding CO again. In a similar way, H2CO is also the product of abstraction reactions of CH3OH. In this work, we show that the dominant intermediate radicals of CH3OH abstraction and H2CO addition reactions are CH2OH and CH3O, respectively. By considering both addition and abstration reactions, more reactive intermediates (HCO, CH3O and CH2OH) are produced in the ice mantle than previously thought, focussing on sequential H-atom addition reactions only. Inclusion of both types of reactions also enhances the probability to form COMs through radical-radical recombination without the need of UV photolysis or cosmic rays bombardment as external triggers. The formation of COMs realized in this way, is proven by RAIRS and TPD, also using isotopically labelled species.

232017-01-09 Mon
14:20~15:20
R1203
Erwin Lau
[Yale]
*Special Seminar*
Modeling baryonic physics in galaxy clusters
Abstract

Galaxy clusters play an important role in modern precision cosmology. As the most massive virialized objects in the universe, their abundance depends sensitively on cosmological parameters. However, uncertainties in galaxy cluster physics pose serious challenges to using forthcoming observations to make advances in cosmology with galaxy clusters. In this talk, I will highlight how we can improve our understanding of galaxy cluster physics with the state-of-the-art numerical simulations and semi-analytical modelling. In particular, I will present results from the "Omega500" simulation, a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation suite of galaxy cluster formation that follows the evolution of dark matter and baryons in a realistic cosmological setting. I will also outline upcoming challenges in the computational modelling of major physical processes in galaxy clusters, and how we can address them in anticipation of upcoming multi-wavelength cluster surveys in the next decade.

242017-01-04 Wed
14:20~15:20
R1203
Allison Man
[ESO]
How to quench a massive galaxy?
Abstract

The progenitors of the local-day elliptical galaxies have formed the bulk of their stars in the first few Gyr of the Universe. This implies that already by z=2, there is a population of massive galaxies that have terminated their star formation somehow, and become quenched. Many plausible mechanisms have been proposed to explain early quenching in massive galaxies (e.g., active galactic nuclei feedback, halo quenching, morphological quenching). However, until recently the observations at hand are insufficient to allow us to distinguish between these mechanisms. I will review our knowledge on this topic thus far, and present efforts to tackle this decade-old question.

TEL: 886-2-3365-2200 FAX: 886-2-2367-7849
General: asiaa_replace2@_asiaa.sinica.edu.tw Media Request: epo_replace2@_asiaa.sinica.edu.tw
11F of AS/NTU Astronomy-Mathematics Building, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Rd, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C.